Michael Lacey Shows Math Miracles

Michael Lacey has proven that the field of mathematics is one still worth exploring. He has shown over and over again how understanding of this field can change the way we operate in this world and make life better for each and every one of us.

 

Michael Lacey is a receiver of the Guggenheim fellowship award in 2004. This is a grant which allows him to take time off of work to pursue his own interest in mathematics so that he can continue expanding our understanding of probability. The grant that he was given averages to about $42,000. It was given to him after the Guggenheim fellowship weeded out 4000 other applicants. It was given to him because so far in his career his already shown himself to be productive and a prodigy in the field of mathematics. Other receivers of the Guggenheim fellowship are people who won the Pulitzer Prize and are Nobel laureates. This means that he is certainly the top of his profession. He was recognized by the Simon foundation right before the American mathematical society reach out to him and offered him fellowship.

 

Michael Lacey prepared to change a few of mathematics by mentoring underneath Walter Philip at the University of Illinois. At the ripe young age of 28 Michael Lacey would receive his PhD in mathematics after writing a thesis on Banach spaces which helped to solve a problem with the iterated logarithms.

 

From there, Michael Lacey would take advice Walter Philip and begin working at the University of North Carolina. Located at Chapel Hill, Michael Lacey was able to continue his friendship with his old mentor as the two of them combined their brains to continue proving their central limit theorem. After just a few years they had been able to write enough peer-reviewed papers to prove this theory beyond any reasonable doubt.

 

Michael Lacey would ultimately end up at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Here is known by his students to be a difficult professor who teaches you how to think differently about the concepts of math. He is also mentoring doctoral students.